Colleges Must Help Further the Goals of Common Core Standards, Report Says

Chronicle of Higher Education - Tue, 2014-07-22 03:55

Higher education cannot afford to sit on the sidelines as states and secondary schools agree on what it means to be ready for college or a job.

Categories: Higher Education News

A Sociologist Asks What Happens When Art Goes Academic

Chronicle of Higher Education - Tue, 2014-07-22 03:55

Gary Alan Fine, known for studying subcultures of work and play, turns his attention to the college art scene.

Categories: Higher Education News

U.S. Supreme Court Hosts “Let’s Read! Let’s Move!” Event — An Historic First

U.S. Department of Education Blog - Mon, 2014-07-21 13:37

Students walk toward the Supreme Court for the second Let’s Read, Let’s Move! event of 2014. (Photo credit: U.S. Department of Education)

The second Let’s Read! Let’s Move! session of this summer took place at the U.S. Supreme Court on July 16. It was the first time the literacy and enrichment event was held at the historic location.

With the Capitol dome as the backdrop, students from Washington, D.C.-area schools exited their yellow school buses, squinting as they peered in awe at the massive columns of the Supreme Court.  Students hailed from William Paca Elementary School, St. Philips Child Development Center, the Metropolitan Day School, the United Planning Organization, and Judith P. Hoyer Montessori School.

A young girl got into the Let’s Move! spirit, counting as she climbed the steps to the courtroom, “…35, 36, 37, 38—wow!” Extending their arms towards the ceiling to take in the size of the vast space in the Great Hall under the rotunda, children peeked into the courtroom on their way to the East conference room.

Secretary Arne Duncan, joined by Marshal of the U.S. Supreme Court Pamela Talkin, and U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Burwell, read Marshall the Courthouse Mouse: A Tail of the Supreme Court. Phrases from the book, such as “voting unani-MOUSE-ly,” generated laughs from everyone in the room.

Secretary Burwell kneeled with the children to show the illustrations in the books and to point out that each page had hidden turtles—symbols of longevity, and the slow, yet deliberate pace of justice.

During the question-and-answer session, a child asked, “Why is the courthouse so pretty?” Talkin explained, “It is made to look special so every citizen understands how important the law is, as [the law] covers everyone from children to grown-ups, protecting our rights. It is a beautiful building because it does a beautiful thing, and we have a system that works.”

Energetic shrieks could be heard as the Let’s Move! activities commenced in the courtyard with joyful children participating in Supreme Court-themed activities emphasizing teamwork.

Children participated in the Scales of Justice Bean Bag Balance, the Majority Rules and Statute Stackers Relay Race, the Bill of Rights Frenzy, and they “exercised” their rights with the YMCA’s Physically Healthy and Driven program volunteers.

When I asked some students about their favorite part of the event, many responded, “Having the book read out loud.” In the courtyard, a student shrieked, “I found the turtles!” Sure enough, under the antique lamp posts were turtle sculptures.

The summer learning continued as interns, YMCA volunteers, and ED staff entered the courtroom for a lecture about the judicial functions of the Supreme Court and the building’s history.

The next two Let’s Read! Let’s Move! events will be held on July 23 and July 30.

Viviana Altamirano is a rising junior at Middlebury College. She is an intern in the Office of Communications and Outreach at the U.S. Department of Education.

Categories: Higher Education News

Fafsa Fix Will Mean Less Aid for Many

Chronicle of Higher Education - Mon, 2014-07-21 13:00

The Education Department is reprocessing the student-aid applications of 200,000 who inadvertently reported too much income. But it’s not working out in their favor.

Categories: Higher Education News

What Men­tors Of­ten Miss

Chronicle of Higher Education - Mon, 2014-07-21 10:23

Although it’s rare­ly dis­cussed, a per­son­al re­la­tion­ship is what makes men­tor­ing mean­ing­ful for both par­ties.

Categories: Higher Education News

Great Colleges Create a Culture of Accountability and Cooperation

Chronicle of Higher Education - Sun, 2014-07-20 22:55

More than 43,500 staff and faculty members weighed in for this year’s survey about what makes certain institutions great places to work.

Categories: Higher Education News

'I've Always Thought of Myself More as a Midwife'

Chronicle of Higher Education - Sun, 2014-07-20 22:18

Kathleen Conzen, a historian at the University of Chicago, inspired such devotion among her mentees that they held a symposium on her when she retired.

Categories: Higher Education News

Great Colleges To Work For 2014

Chronicle of Higher Education - Sun, 2014-07-20 22:14

The Chronicle's seventh annual survey recognized 92 outstanding colleges nationwide. View the full list to find out which colleges made the cut.

Categories: Higher Education News

Great Colleges Create a Culture of Accountability and Cooperation

Chronicle of Higher Education - Sun, 2014-07-20 22:08

More than 43,500 staff and faculty members weighed in for this year’s survey about what makes certain institutions great places to work.

Categories: Higher Education News

The Difference a Boss Makes

Chronicle of Higher Education - Sun, 2014-07-20 22:08

Tenure-line faculty members don’t have bosses. Administrators really, really do.

Categories: Higher Education News

Trouble Finding Mentors on Campus? Go Online

Chronicle of Higher Education - Sun, 2014-07-20 22:08

The new era of mentoring is based increasingly on relationships created within virtual spaces, but they don’t just happen. Here’s how to develop them.

Categories: Higher Education News

'Give Them Good Advice'

Chronicle of Higher Education - Sun, 2014-07-20 22:08

Robert T. Paine, a retired ecologist at the University of Washington, is known for encouraging students to follow their own interests.

Categories: Higher Education News

'You Pay It Forward'

Chronicle of Higher Education - Sun, 2014-07-20 22:08

Richard A. Tapia, a mathematician at Rice University, says he knows how to be both a friend and an adviser to his students.

Categories: Higher Education News

The Difference Mentoring Makes

Chronicle of Higher Education - Sun, 2014-07-20 22:08

Everyone agrees that it helps new professors find their way. But it works best when colleges recognize and support mentors’ efforts.

Categories: Higher Education News

The Uncertain Future of Academic Work

Chronicle of Higher Education - Sun, 2014-07-20 22:08

Now more than ever, those employed in higher education face the forces of change.

Categories: Higher Education News

Spotting a Bad Adviser—and How to Pick a Good One

Chronicle of Higher Education - Sun, 2014-07-20 22:08

How can you avoid a picking a bad mentor if you’re not sure what you’re looking for in the first place?

Categories: Higher Education News
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