Higher Education News

DeVos Keeps Higher Ed — and Reporters — at Arm’s Length

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 3, 2017 - 7:47pm
The education secretary’s aversion to national media, and her communication style, have created a knowledge gap for college leaders seeking to understand her philosophy on higher ed.
Categories: Higher Education News

U. of Mississippi Alumna Wins Chronicle’s Miller Award for Young Journalists

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 3, 2017 - 2:37pm
Clara Turnage, now a reporter for The Natchez Democrat, in Mississippi, was honored for articles she wrote during her Chronicle internship this past summer.
Categories: Higher Education News

Can a 20-Minute Test Tell Employers What a College Degree Cannot?

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 3, 2017 - 2:12pm
Some companies and education groups think so. A spate of attempts to assess job readiness offers a new challenge to the value of higher education.
Categories: Higher Education News

Instructors, Did You Ever Cheat When You Were a Student?

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 3, 2017 - 10:06am
There’s a good chance that, as professors, you’re now in a position to make or enforce rules about plagiarism and other forms of cheating. Has your past experience informed your teaching strategy?
Categories: Higher Education News

Undergraduate Research Surges, Despite Uncertainties Over Best Practices

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 2, 2017 - 7:51pm
All types of colleges are embracing research at the undergraduate level. Finding the best features and combinations of experiences, however, is very much a work in progress.
Categories: Higher Education News

The Trump Administration Says Colleges Are Suppressing Free Speech. How Should They Respond?

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 2, 2017 - 6:25pm
Administrators and experts suggest that higher-education institutions acknowledge room for improvement while reframing the narrative about freedom of expression.
Categories: Higher Education News

Evergreen State College Students Are Penalized for Protests

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 2, 2017 - 12:52pm
Of the 180 students named in an incident report on campus protests last spring, about 80 were sanctioned for breaking the Washington institution’s code of student conduct.
Categories: Higher Education News

12 Myths About the FAFSA® Form and Applying for Financial Aid

U.S. Department of Education Blog - October 2, 2017 - 8:00am

There’s so much information available about financial aid for college or career school that it can be hard to tell the facts from fiction. We’ve got you covered! Here are some common myths—and the real scoop—about financial aid and the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®) form.

MYTH 1: My parents make too much money, so I won’t qualify for any aid.

FACT: The reality is there’s no income cut-off to qualify for federal student aid. It doesn’t matter if you have a low or high income; most people qualify for some type of financial aid, including low-interest federal student loans. Many factors besides income—such as your family size and your year in school—are taken into account.

TIP: When you fill out the FAFSA form, you’re also automatically applying for funds from your state, and possibly from your school as well. In fact, some schools won’t even consider you for any of their scholarships (including academic scholarships) until you’ve submitted a FAFSA form. Don’t make assumptions about what you’ll get—fill out the application and find out!

MYTH 2: The 2018–19 FAFSA® form launches on Jan. 1.

FACT: The 2018–19 FAFSA form launched on Oct. 1. You should submit a FAFSA form as early as possible because some states and schools have limited funds.

MYTH 3: I should use my 2017 tax information to fill out the 2018–19 FAFSA® form.

FACT: You must use your 2016 tax information to complete the 2018–19 FAFSA form. (The requirements changed last year.) It doesn’t matter if you or your parents haven’t filed 2017 taxes yet, because the 2018–19 FAFSA form doesn’t need that information. You won’t have to update your FAFSA form after filing 2017 taxes either, because 2016 information is what’s required. If your financial situation has changed since 2016, complete the 2018–19 FAFSA form using the tax information it requires (2016), and then contact your school’s financial aid office to discuss the change in your situation. They can make updates to your FAFSA information if warranted.

MYTH 4: I support myself, so I don’t have to include my parent’s info on the FAFSA® form.

FACT: This is not necessarily true. Even if you support yourself, live on your own, or file your own taxes, you may still be considered a dependent student for FAFSA purposes. The FAFSA form asks a series of questions to determine your dependency status. If you’re independent, you won’t need to include your parents’ information on your FAFSA form. But if you’re dependent, you must provide your parents’ information.

If you’re a dependent student, find out who is considered your parent for FAFSA purposes. (It’s not as obvious as you might think.)

MYTH 5: I should wait until I’m accepted to a college before I fill out the FAFSA® form.

FACT: Don’t wait. You can start now! As a matter of fact, you can start as early as your senior year of high school. You must list at least one college to receive your information. You SHOULD list all schools you’re considering even if you haven’t applied or been accepted yet. It doesn’t hurt your application to add more schools; colleges can’t see the other schools you’ve added. In fact, you don’t even have to remove schools if you later decide not to apply or attend. If you don’t end up applying or getting accepted to a school, the school can just disregard your FAFSA form.

You can add up to 10 schools at a time. If you’re applying to more than 10 schools, here’s what you should do. If you want to add another school after you submit your FAFSA form, you can log in at fafsa.gov and submit a correction.

The schools you list will use your FAFSA information to determine the types and amounts of aid you may receive.

MYTH 6: If I didn’t receive enough money for school. I’m just out of luck.

FACT: You still have options! If you’ve received federal, state, and college aid but still find yourself having to fill the gap between what your financial aid covers and what you owe your school, check out these 7 options.

MYTH 7: I should call “the FAFSA® people” (Federal Student Aid) to find out how much financial aid money I’m getting and when.

FACT: No, you’ll have to contact your school. Federal Student Aid does not award or disburse your aid, so we won’t be able to tell you what you’ll get or when you’ll get it. You will have to contact the financial aid office at your school to find out the status of your aid and when you should expect it. Just keep in mind that each school has a different timeline for awarding financial aid.

MYTH 8: There’s only one FAFSA® deadline and that’s not until June.

FACT: Nope! There are at least three deadlines you need to check: your state, school, and federal deadlines. You can find the state and federal deadlines at fafsa.gov. You’ll need to check your school’s website for their FAFSA deadline. If you’re applying to multiple schools, make sure to check all of their deadlines and apply by the earliest one. Also, if you’re applying to any scholarships that require the FAFSA form, they might have a different deadline as well! Even if your deadlines aren’t for a while, we recommend you fill out the FAFSA form as soon as possible to make sure you don’t miss out on any aid.

MYTH 9: I only have fill out the FAFSA® form once.

FACT: You have to fill out the FAFSA form every year you’re in school in order to stay eligible for federal student aid.

MYTH 10: I can share an FSA ID with my parent(s).

FACT: Nope, if you’re a dependent student, then two people will need their own FSA ID to sign your FAFSA form online:

  1. You (the student)
  2. One of your parents

An FSA ID is a username and password that you use to log in to certain U.S. Department of Education (ED) websites. Your FSA ID identifies you as someone who has the right to access your own personal information on ED websites such as fafsa.gov.

If you’re a dependent student, your parent will need his or her own FSA ID to sign your FAFSA form electronically. If your parent has more than one child attending college, he or she can use the same FSA ID to sign all applications. You’ll need a unique email address for each FSA ID.

Your FSA ID is used to sign legally binding documents electronically. It has the same legal status as a written signature. Don’t give your FSA ID to anyone—not even to someone helping you fill out the FAFSA form. Sharing your FSA ID could put you at risk of identity theft and could cause delays in the FAFSA process!

MYTH 11: Only students with good grades get financial aid.

FACT: While a high grade point average will help you get into a good school and may help with academic scholarships, most federal student aid programs do not take grades into consideration when you first apply. Keep in mind that if you want to continue receiving aid throughout your college career, you will have to maintain satisfactory academic progress as determined by your school.

MYTH 12: It costs money to submit the FAFSA® form.

FACT: Absolutely not! You NEVER have to pay to complete the FAFSA form when you go to fafsa.gov. If you’re paying a fee, you’re not on the official government website.

So what’s next?

Go to fafsa.gov and fill out the application. If you applied for admission to a college or career school and have been accepted, and you listed that school on your FAFSA form, the school will calculate your aid and will send you an electronic or paper financial aid offer telling you how much aid you’re eligible for at the school.

 

Mia Johnson is a Management & Program Analyst at the U.S. Department of Education’s office of Federal Student Aid.

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The post 12 Myths About the FAFSA® Form and Applying for Financial Aid appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

One University Takes On the Opioid Crisis

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 1, 2017 - 5:00pm
In West Virginia, confronting the epidemic is a moral obligation and a practical necessity.
Categories: Higher Education News

Getting Faculty Members to Embrace Student Data

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 1, 2017 - 4:30pm
Pierce College has improved graduation rates by breaking down student success, course by course.
Categories: Higher Education News

How 2 Professors Used Data to Improve Their Courses

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 1, 2017 - 4:30pm
One saw a dropout problem in the statistics, and another found a racial disparity in completion rates for a business course.
Categories: Higher Education News

How a Reality TV Star Became the Voice of Sexual-Violence Prevention

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 1, 2017 - 4:30pm
When college coaches need someone to talk to their athletes about the importance of respecting women, they call Alexis Jones.
Categories: Higher Education News

Getting Faculty to Embrace Student Data

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 1, 2017 - 4:30pm
Pierce College has improved graduation rates by breaking down student success course by course.
Categories: Higher Education News

Appointments, Resignations, Deaths (10/6/2017)

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 1, 2017 - 4:23pm
A Harvard dean will lead the University of Virginia, and a chancellor whose hurricane response was deemed unsatisfactory has stepped down.
Categories: Higher Education News

Basketball Scandal Highlights the Power of the Assistant Coach — and the Limits of Oversight

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 29, 2017 - 7:32pm
The charges against former coaches provide a behind-the-scenes look at how assistants serve as key points of access to college players — and how checks on their power fall short.
Categories: Higher Education News

College of the Ozarks Won’t Play Opponents Who Kneel During National Anthem

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 29, 2017 - 3:56pm
The small Christian college said it would not tolerate circumstances in which “disrespect is exhibited toward the American flag or National Anthem.”
Categories: Higher Education News

Inside the Free-Speech Case That Caught Jeff Sessions’ Eye

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 29, 2017 - 12:23pm
The first intervention in campus free-speech cases promised by Attorney General Jeff Sessions has been made, at Georgia Gwinnett College.
Categories: Higher Education News

How to Fill Out the FAFSA When You Have More Than One Child in College

U.S. Department of Education Blog - September 29, 2017 - 8:00am

Having one child who is heading to college can be stressful, but having to help multiple children at the same time can feel like too much to manage. While I can’t save you from a forgotten application deadline or the “how to do your own laundry” lessons, hopefully, I can help make the financial aid part of the process run more smoothly with these tips:

How many FSA IDs will my children and I need? How many FAFSAs do we have to complete?

An FSA ID is a username and password combination that serves as your legal electronic signature throughout the financial aid process—from the first time your children fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid ( FAFSA®) form until the time their loans are paid off. You AND each of your children will need your own FSA ID. Parents and students can create their FSA IDs here.

Note: Your FSA ID is associated with your Social Security number and is equivalent to your legal signature; therefore, each person can only have one FSA ID. If you are a parent, you will use the same FSA ID to sign each of your children’s FAFSA forms.

Each student and one parent need an FSA ID and each of your children will need to fill out a FAFSA. Your children will need to provide your (parent) information on their 2018–19 FAFSA forms unless they are going to graduate school, were born before January 1, 1995, or can answer “yes” to any of these questions.

Example: You have three children who are going to or who are in college. You’ll need four FSA IDs—one for you as the parent (only one parent needs an FSA ID) and one for each child. You’ll need to fill out three FAFSA forms, one for each child.

Can I transfer my information from one child’s FAFSA form to another so I don’t have to re-enter it?

Yes! Once your first child’s FAFSA form is complete, you’ll get to a confirmation page. On the confirmation page, you’ll see a hyperlink that says, “transfer your parents’ information into a new FAFSA.” Make sure you have your pop-up blocker turned off and click that link.

TIP: If you want the process to go as smoothly as possible, your second child should have his/her FSA ID handy so you’re ready for the next step.

 

You’ll then see the alert below confirming that you want to transfer your information to another FAFSA.

 

Once you click “OK,” a new window will open allowing your other child to start his or her FAFSA form. We recommend that your child starts the FAFSA form by entering his or her FSA ID (not your FSA ID) using the option on the left in the image below. However, if you are starting your child’s FAFSA form, choose the option on the right and enter your child’s information.

IMPORTANT:  Regardless of who starts the application from this screen, the FAFSA form remains the student’s application; so when the FAFSA form says “you” it means the student. If the FAFSA form is asking for parent information, it will specify that. When in doubt, refer to the left side of the screen. It will indicate whether you’re on a student page (blue) or a parent page (purple).

 

After you select the FAFSA form you’d like to complete and create a save key, you’ll be brought to the introduction page, which will indicate that parental data was copied into your second child’s FAFSA form.

Once you reach the parent information page, you will see your information pre-populated. Verify this info, proceed to sign and submit the FAFSA form, and you’re done!

NOTE: If you have a third (or fourth, fifth, etc.) child who needs to fill out the FAFSA form and provide your information, repeat this process until you’ve finished all your children’s FAFSA forms.

I have education savings accounts (529 plan, etc.) for my children. How do I report those on the FAFSA form?

You report the value of all education savings accounts owned by you, your child, or any other dependent children in your household as a parent investment. (Read “What is the net worth of your parents’ investments?” for more information.) If you have education savings accounts for multiple children, you must report the combined current value of those accounts, even if some of those children are not in college yet or are not completing a FAFSA form.

Example: Child 1 and 2 are filling out the FAFSA. Child 3 is in 8th grade. They each have 529 college savings plan accounts in their names.

  • Child 1 account balance: $20,000
  • Child 2 account balance: $13,000
  • Child 3 account balance: $8,000

You would add $41,000 to any other parent investments you’re required to report and input it when asked, “What is the net worth of your parents’ investments?” on each of your children’s FAFSAs.

How does having more than one child in college impact the amount of financial aid my children qualify for?

Having multiple children enrolled in college at the same time could have an impact on your children’s eligibility for need-based federal financial aid.

TIP: We often hear about families who choose not to fill out the FAFSA form again because they believe that they won’t qualify for grants or scholarships, especially if they did not qualify the previous year. This is a huge mistake, especially if you will have additional children entering college. Read on to learn why.

Schools use the following formula to determine a student’s eligibility for need-based financial aid:

Cost of attendance (COA) – Expected Family Contribution (EFC) = financial need

Let’s break down this formula:

Cost of attendance: This will vary by school, so if you have two children attending different schools with different costs, their financial need may be different, even if their EFC is the same.

Expected Family Contribution: The information you provide on the FAFSA form is used to calculate your child’s Expected Family Contribution (EFC). The EFC is a combination of how much a parent and student are expected to contribute towards the student’s cost to attend college. The EFC is not necessarily the amount of money your family will have to pay for college, nor is it the amount of federal student aid you will receive. It is a number used by your child’s school to calculate how much financial aid he or she is eligible to receive. Since we recognize that a parent’s annual ability to pay doesn’t change as you have more children enroll in college, we divide the expected parent contribution portion by the number of children you expect to have in college.

Example: Let’s assume that all of your dependent children have identical financial information and that the calculated EFC assuming one child in college would be $10,000. Here’s how each child’s EFC would change depending on the number of family members attending college full-time.

Number of dependent children in college full-time Each child’s EFC 1 $10,000 2 $5,000 3 $3,333 4 $2,500

Financial need: Please note that schools differ (sometimes greatly) in their ability to meet each student’s financial need. To compare average school costs schools based on family income, visit the CollegeScorecard.ed.gov.

Nicole Callahan is a Digital Engagement Strategist at the U.S. Department of Education’s office of Federal Student Aid.

Photo by Getty Images

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The post How to Fill Out the FAFSA When You Have More Than One Child in College appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

A Lesson in Student Data for Professors

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 28, 2017 - 10:00pm
Frustration over grading discrepancies inspired an experiment that is earning a community college national attention.
Categories: Higher Education News

At the U. of Puerto Rico, Widespread Damage and Anxiety After Maria

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 28, 2017 - 6:34pm
A top administrator is optimistic that insurance and disaster-relief funds will cover repairs, but students worry that the one-two punch of hurricanes will keep them from finishing classes this semester.
Categories: Higher Education News

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