Higher Education News

Why This President Wants Betsy DeVos at His College's Commencement

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 11, 2017 - 5:46pm
Kurt Schmoke says that the University of Baltimore respects freedom of speech and that he expects any protest of the education secretary’s address to be civil and respectful.
Categories: Higher Education News

Report Faults U. of Virginia on Response to White-Supremacist Rally

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 11, 2017 - 4:31pm
University administrators and police officers did not pay enough attention to tips about the event, and policies that might have prevented violence were not enforced.
Categories: Higher Education News

ED Expands Hurricane Help Website

U.S. Department of Education Blog - September 11, 2017 - 3:58pm

The United States Department of Education has expanded the Hurricane Help page on its website. Originally created in response to Hurricane Harvey, the site now includes a page for information related to Hurricane Irma as well as a page containing general hurricane information.

The pages for Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma contain links to federal resources, including the latest information from FEMA and the Department of Homeland Security as well as government-wide activities related to each of the hurricanes (from the General Services Administration) and other information for those impacted by these two storms. Each of the hurricane help pages also provides lists of resources specifically related to education.

All of these sites are continually updated so users are urged to continue checking for the latest.

The post ED Expands Hurricane Help Website appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

When Florida State U. Opened Up Free Parking, a Dealership Filled It With Infinitis

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 11, 2017 - 11:59am
As the region prepared for Hurricane Irma, a car dealership reportedly took advantage of the university’s efforts to safeguard people’s cars.
Categories: Higher Education News

Can Design Thinking Redesign Higher Ed?

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 10, 2017 - 5:00pm
Many academics are drawn to the philosophy’s reputation as a font of innovation. But can colleges really get on board with “a bias to action”?
Categories: Higher Education News

How Design Thinking Can Be Applied Across the Campus

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 10, 2017 - 5:00pm
The idea shows promise even in tougher campus settings — like the faculty senate.
Categories: Higher Education News

Applying the Yardstick, Department by Department

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 10, 2017 - 4:30pm
An effort to measure academic units passes the test at Oklahoma State University.
Categories: Higher Education News

Measuring Up

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 10, 2017 - 4:30pm
Interested in quantifying the output of your academic departments? Here's how you might do it without alienating your faculty.
Categories: Higher Education News

Gauging an Academic Unit’s Performance

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 10, 2017 - 4:30pm
Enrollment, finances, and more: Here are some examples of how colleges assess a department's viability.
Categories: Higher Education News

Sizing Up Departments, Dollar by Dollar

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 10, 2017 - 4:30pm
At colleges where enrollment is stagnant or falling and public funding is scarce, some administrators have responded by measuring the financial viability of each academic unit.
Categories: Higher Education News

Applying the Yardstick, Department by Department

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 10, 2017 - 4:30pm
An effort to measure academic units passes the test at Oklahoma State.
Categories: Higher Education News

Appointments, Resignations, Deaths (September 15, 2017)

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 10, 2017 - 4:30pm
Michael A. Baston is the new president of Rockland Community College, and Robert Blouin is the new provost of the University of North Carolina.
Categories: Higher Education News

U. of California Sues Trump Administration Over DACA Decision

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 8, 2017 - 12:53pm
Janet Napolitano, now president of the university system, devised the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program in 2012, when she was secretary of homeland security.
Categories: Higher Education News

Board Votes to Ban U. of North Carolina Civil-Rights Center From Litigating Cases

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 8, 2017 - 12:50pm
The decision raises questions about the future of the center, which performs legal work for minority and low-income groups.
Categories: Higher Education News

The Steering Committee

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 8, 2017 - 11:23am
In 2015 the most famous bovine in college sports died. How does a university go about replacing a live mascot?
Categories: Higher Education News

Florida’s Governor Closes Public Colleges as Irma Bears Down on Peninsula

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 7, 2017 - 5:12pm
Gov. Rick Scott ordered institutions closed through Monday as Hurricane Irma headed toward the state.
Categories: Higher Education News

Florida Colleges Rush to Prepare as Irma Bears Down on Peninsula

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 7, 2017 - 5:12pm
Hurricane Irma is headed toward Florida, and campus leaders across the state are making important decisions about evacuations and closures.
Categories: Higher Education News

Teaching Newsletter: Immigration and Graduate Students, 9/7/2017

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 7, 2017 - 2:55pm
The Trump administration’s decision to phase out the policy known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, dominated the news earlier this week. The administration's strict stance on immigration is bound to have an impact on the college classroom in other ways. 
Categories: Higher Education News

3 FAFSA Deadlines You Need to Be Aware of

U.S. Department of Education Blog - September 7, 2017 - 1:00pm


Ah, deadlines. The sworn enemy of students across the nation. When you’re busy with classes, extracurricular activities, and a social life in whatever time you’ve got left, it’s easy to lose track and let due dates start whooshing by. All of a sudden, your 10-page term paper is due in an hour, and you’re only on page 5 (with the help of 26-point type and triple line spacing). We get it.

Nevertheless, we’re here to point out a few critical deadlines that you really shouldn’t miss: those to do with the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®) form. By submitting your FAFSA form late, you might be forfeiting big money that can help you pay for college.

Here are those three deadlines:

1. The College Deadline

The first type of deadline comes from colleges themselves, and—spoiler alert—it’s typically pretty early. These deadlines vary from school to school, but they usually come well before the academic year starts. If you’re applying to multiple colleges, be sure to look up each school’s FAFSA deadline and apply by the earliest one.

Many of these FAFSA due dates are priority deadlines. This means that you need to get your FAFSA form in by that date to be considered for the most money. Many colleges have this date clearly marked on their financial aid pages. If you can’t find it, you can always call the school’s financial aid office.

If you’re worried about gathering information to complete the FAFSA form in time to meet this deadline, don’t be. You can apply as early as Oct. 1 (instead of Jan. 1 as you may have done in the past). This earlier submission date will give you more time to complete the FAFSA form before college deadlines approach, which means more time to compare schools. You’ll use earlier (2016) tax information, so there’s no need for estimates.

Didn’t think it could get any easier? The earlier launch date coincides with many college application deadlines, so go ahead and apply for schools and for federal aid at the same time. If you haven’t figured out where you’re applying yet, don’t worry! You can still submit the FAFSA form. Just add any school you’re considering, even if you’re not sure whether you’ll apply or be accepted. You can always add or remove schools later.

2. The State Deadline

The second deadline is determined by your home state. Starting on Oct.1, you can check your state’s deadline here. Some states have hard deadlines and other states have suggested deadlines to make sure you get priority consideration for college money. There’s also a group of states that offer first-come, first-served financial aid. If your state’s deadline is “As soon as possible after Oct. 1, 2017,” you should get your FAFSA form submitted ASAP. Many of these states award financial aid funds only until they run out, so the sooner you apply, the better your chances.

3. The Federal Deadline

This last deadline comes from us, the U.S. Department of Education, aka the FAFSA folks. Our only time constraint is that each year’s FAFSA form becomes unavailable on June 30 at the end of the academic year it applies to.

That means that the 2018–19 FAFSA form (which will be available on Oct. 1, 2017) will disappear from fafsa.gov on June 30, 2019, because that’s the end of the 2018–19 school year. That’s right; you can technically go through your entire year at college before accessing the FAFSA form. However, a few federal student aid programs have limited funds, so be sure to apply as soon as you can. Also, as we said, earlier deadlines from states and colleges make waiting a bad idea.

Why so many deadlines?

All these entities award their financial aid money differently and at different times. What they all have in common, though, is that they use the FAFSA form to assess eligibility for their aid programs. So when a college wants to get its aid squared away before the academic year starts, it needs your FAFSA form to make that happen. If you want in on that college money, you need to help the college out by getting your information in by its deadline. The same goes for state aid programs. Additionally, many outside scholarship programs need to see your FAFSA info before they will consider your application. If you’re applying for scholarships, you need to stay on top of those deadlines, too.

What happens if I miss the deadlines?

Don’t miss the deadlines. Plan to get your FAFSA form in by the earliest of all the deadlines for your best crack at college money. By missing deadlines, you take yourself out of the running for money you might otherwise get. Some states and colleges continue awarding aid to FAFSA latecomers, but your chances get much slimmer, and the payout is often less if you do get aid. It’s just better not to miss the deadlines.

If you miss the end-of-June federal deadline, you’re no longer eligible to submit that year’s FAFSA form. Did we mention not to miss the deadlines?

Across the board, the motto really is “the sooner the better.” So turn in your FAFSA form and that term paper as soon as possible (without the 26-point type). Apply by the earliest deadline. Get your FAFSA form done today!

Drew Goins is a former intern with the U.S. Department of Education’s office of Federal Student Aid. Likes: politics, language, good puns. Dislikes: mainly kale.

Nora Onley is a Management and Program Analyst with the U.S. Department of Education’s office of Federal Student Aid.

Continue the conversation on Facebook or Twitter.

The post 3 FAFSA Deadlines You Need to Be Aware of appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

Majority of UNC Board Criticizes Handling of Confederate Statue at Chapel Hill

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 7, 2017 - 12:05pm
Some members of the University of North Carolina system’s Board of Governors disagreed with actions by the system’s president, the campus’s chancellor, and the board chair.
Categories: Higher Education News

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