Higher Education News

Supreme Court Will Review Travel Ban, but Allows It to Take Partial Effect in Meantime

Chronicle of Higher Education - 1 hour 21 min ago
Because the justices will not hear the case until the autumn, parts of the controversial policy — struck down by lower courts — will be in effect for months, with implications for colleges.
Categories: Higher Education News

U. of Delaware Will Not Rehire Adjunct Who Criticized Otto Warmbier

Chronicle of Higher Education - 3 hours 9 min ago
“Is it wrong of me to think,” the faculty member had written online of the student who died after being imprisoned by North Korea for 17 months, that he “got exactly what he deserved?”
Categories: Higher Education News

In the Time of Trump, Colleges Start to ‘Make Title IX Our Own’

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 25, 2017 - 6:01pm
After the president’s election, speculation abounded that colleges might scale back their efforts to combat sexual violence. Instead, many Title IX coordinators are trying to chart a new path forward.
Categories: Higher Education News

U. of Delaware Condemns Adjunct's Posts That Said Otto Warmbier 'Got Exactly What He Deserved'

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 24, 2017 - 5:25pm
The professor, Katherine A. Dettwyler, wrote Facebook posts comparing the University of Virginia student, who died after being held captive for 17 months, to "a lot of the young, white, rich, clueless males who come into my classes."
Categories: Higher Education News

U. of Delaware Condemns Adjunct Who Said Otto Warmbier 'Got Exactly What He Deserved'

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 24, 2017 - 5:25pm
The professor, Katherine A. Dettwyler, wrote Facebook posts comparing the University of Virginia student, who died after being held captive for 17 months, to "a lot of the young, white, rich, clueless males who come into my classes."
Categories: Higher Education News

Jury Convicts 3rd Former Vanderbilt U. Athlete in 2013 Gang Rape

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 23, 2017 - 6:38pm
Two members of the university's football team are already serving long prison terms for their roles in the attack, and their video of the incident helped convict them.
Categories: Higher Education News

As a Free-Speech Bill Advances in Wisconsin, Some Fear a Chilling Effect

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 23, 2017 - 6:37pm
Under a bill passed by Wisconsin’s Assembly, students could be suspended for disrupting a campus speaker. Proponents say the bill would protect free speech, while critics say it, in fact, would do the opposite.
Categories: Higher Education News

Judge Declares Another Mistrial in Fatal Shooting by U. of Cincinnati Officer

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 23, 2017 - 1:55pm
Jurors deadlocked for the second time in less than a year in the case of the death of an unarmed black man during a traffic stop in 2015.
Categories: Higher Education News

Diversity on a Small Scale

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 23, 2017 - 1:45pm
Sean M. Decatur, president of Kenyon College, stopped by The Chronicle's offices recently to discuss how his institution is working to reach more low-income students.
Categories: Higher Education News

What Would the Repeal of Higher Ed’s Foundational Law Mean for Colleges?

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 23, 2017 - 12:05pm
Betsy DeVos has suggested a wholesale rethinking of the Higher Education Act of 1965, and a key senator has supported such a move in the past. A repeal would face steep odds, but also presents an opportunity.
Categories: Higher Education News

U. of Missouri Rescinds Bill Cosby’s Honorary Degree, Joining Over 20 Colleges

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 23, 2017 - 11:15am
The university system decided to revoke the degree nearly two years after many other colleges did the same thing.
Categories: Higher Education News

Signal Boost: How Conservative Media Outlets Turn Faculty Viewpoints Into National News

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 22, 2017 - 8:40pm
Three professors made provocative statements about race and politics. Then the outrage machine went to work.
Categories: Higher Education News

Professors’ Growing Risk: Harassment for Things They Never Really Said

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 22, 2017 - 8:00pm
College faculty members are facing not just online backlash, but threats of violence, as a result of how conservative media outlets characterize their views.
Categories: Higher Education News

Elsevier Wins $15 Million in Copyright Suit Against Piracy Sites

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 22, 2017 - 4:21pm
The science-publishing giant brought the suit against Sci-Hub and other websites that provide free, pirated access to copyright-protected articles. Whether anything will change is uncertain.
Categories: Higher Education News

Colleges Face More Pressure on Student Outcomes, but Success Isn’t Always Easy to Measure

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 22, 2017 - 3:50pm
Federal data don’t paint a pretty picture of some two-year colleges. Are they really failing?
Categories: Higher Education News

HBCUs Have a Leadership Problem. This Group Thinks It Has an Answer.

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 22, 2017 - 3:18pm
A search firm aimed at strengthening the leadership pipeline for black colleges saw limited success in its first year, but has higher hopes for the future.
Categories: Higher Education News

9 Myths About the FSA ID

U.S. Department of Education Blog - June 22, 2017 - 12:56pm

The FSA ID is a username and password that students, parents, and borrowers must use to log on to certain U.S. Department of Education websites such as fafsa.gov, StudentAid.gov, and StudentLoans.gov. The FSA ID is a secure way to access and sign important documents without using personally identifiable information.

Log-in options on fafsa.gov

Log-in options on StudentAid.gov

Log-in options on StudentLoans.gov

As with any new process, there are some myths floating around about creating and using an FSA ID. Let’s tackle some of those myths right now…

Myth #1:

It’ll take a long time to create my FSA ID.

On average, it takes about seven minutes to create an FSA ID. Federal Student Aid has a variety of resources, such as this helpful video, that walk you through each step of creating an FSA ID.

 

Myth #2:

Only students need to create an FSA ID.

If you are a dependent student, then your parent will need his or her own FSA ID in order to sign the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®) form electronically. That’s because you will need to provide your parent’s information on your FAFSA form, and your parent will need to sign the FAFSA form as well. But here is something very important: Your parent must create his or her own, separate FSA ID. Your parent shouldn’t use your FSA ID, and you shouldn’t create an FSA ID for your parent.

If you’re not sure whether you’re a dependent student, visit StudentAid.gov/dependency.

Myth #3:

It’s okay to let someone else create or use my FSA ID.

Not okay. Each individual person needs to create his or her own FSA ID. If you’re a parent, you should NOT create an FSA ID for your child. If you’re a student, you should NOT create an FSA ID for your parent. Why? For example, if a parent tries to create both the parent’s and child’s FSA IDs, it’s easy to mix up information such as Social Security numbers, dates of birth, and usernames and passwords. Because we verify your information with the Social Security Administration, it’s crucial that this information be correct. Also, if someone else creates your FSA ID, how will you know the answers to your challenge questions if you need to retrieve a forgotten username or password?

Most importantly, FSA IDs are used to sign legally binding documents, so giving someone access to your FSA ID is like allowing them to forge your signature. Be sure to create your own FSA ID, and save yourself the trouble.

Myth #4:

I need an email address or mobile phone number to create an FSA ID.

You do NOT need an email address or mobile phone number to create an FSA ID. If you don’t have an email address or mobile phone number, you can leave those fields blank. However, adding this information is strongly recommended. Once your email address is verified, you can enter your email address instead of your username when you log in. You can also use your email address or mobile phone number to retrieve your forgotten username or password or to unlock your account. It’s easy to update and verify your email address or mobile phone number by going to fsaid.ed.gov and clicking on the “Manage My FSA ID” tab.

Manage My FSA ID tab

Myth #5:

As a parent, I can use the same email address or mobile phone number for both my FSA ID and my child’s FSA ID.

An email address or mobile phone number cannot be used with more than one FSA ID. If you’re a student and you choose to provide an email address and/or mobile phone number when creating your FSA ID, you’ll need to include your own email address and/or mobile phone number. Your parent will need to include his or her own email address and/or mobile phone number when creating his or her FSA ID. If you don’t have an email address or mobile phone number, you can leave those fields blank.

Myth #6:

I need an FSA ID to fill out the FAFSA® form.

The fastest way to sign and submit your FAFSA form is to use an FSA ID. That said, if you or your parent don’t have an FSA ID, you can still submit the FAFSA form. If you fill out the FAFSA form online but don’t have an FSA ID, you can choose the option to submit your FAFSA form without signatures, and then print and mail a signature page. If you can’t fill out the FAFSA form online, you have other options.

Students without access to a computer can receive FAFSA assistance from a wide range of college access organizations, such as the National College Access Network; a student can also visit a local library, use a computer at school, or get help from a school counselor.

Myth #7:

The Social Security Administration (SSA) has to verify my information before I can use my FSA ID.

If you’re filling out a FAFSA form for the first time, you can use your newly created FSA ID to sign and submit your FAFSA form right away. But, if you need to submit a renewal FAFSA form or make corrections after you’ve submitted your FAFSA form, you first have to wait for the SSA to verify your identity before you can use your new FSA ID. The verification process takes one to three days.

When creating your FSA ID, make sure to enter your information exactly as it appears on your Social Security card to avoid delays. Once your information is verified, you can use your FSA ID to submit your renewal FAFSA form, make corrections, access your loan history, and a host of other things.

If you’re a parent, you never have to wait for the SSA match to sign your child’s FAFSA form. However, if you sign the FAFSA form when your SSA match status is listed as “pending” and it later returns “no match,” we will remove your signature from your child’s FAFSA form. If that happens, you will either need to resolve the conflict with the SSA and sign electronically again, or you’ll need to print and mail a signature page.

Myth #8:

Confirming my email address or mobile phone number can take up to 24 hours.

You should receive your mobile phone verification code and email confirmation within three minutes. If you don’t, your email account’s spam filter could be the culprit. It’s a good idea to add the FSA ID email address—FSA-ID@ed.gov—to your address book to make sure you get your confirmation.

Myth #9:

I forgot my password, and it’s going to take 30 minutes to reset it.

The easiest way to reset your password is by using your verified email address or verified mobile phone number. If you reset your password using one of these options, you can use your FSA ID immediately. You have to wait 30 minutes only if you reset your password using your challenge questions.

There are lots of resources online to help you create and use your FSA ID; visit StudentAid.gov/fsaid for more FSA ID information. In no time, you’ll have your very own FSA ID too!

Continue the conversation on Facebook or Twitter.

The post 9 Myths About the FSA ID appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

U. of Oregon Athlete Played a Season While Under Investigation for Sexual Assault

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 22, 2017 - 12:34pm
When asked about the case by a student reporter, the university’s president said: “I can’t comment on an individual student. What if I was asked by another reporter about you being obnoxious? Would you want me to tell them that?”
Categories: Higher Education News

University Presses Collaborate to Thrive Where Funding Is Tight

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 21, 2017 - 5:38pm
Bucknell University Press and Rutgers University Press have formed a partnership that they expect will give them greater economies of scale and broaden their profiles.
Categories: Higher Education News

Universities Presses Collaborate to Thrive Where Funding Is Tight

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 21, 2017 - 5:38pm
Bucknell University Press and Rutgers University Press have formed a partnership that they expect will give them greater economies of scale and broaden their profiles.
Categories: Higher Education News

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