CHEO Faculty Professional Development

WICHE coordinated three face-to-face workshops and eight professional development webinars for faculty the first three years of this U.S. Department of Labor TAACCCT grant.  Topics focused on best practice in delivering remote web-based lab experiments and other topics identified by faculty as important in building their knowledge and skills. Read the CHEO Faculty Professional Development Workshops and Webinars Report.

Past Webinars and Workshops Information: 

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CHEO Discipline Panel Faculty Professional Development Workshop:  By Design:  Taking All Allied Health Students Across the Finish Line, May 14-15, 2015, Boulder

Mary Burgess, Kate Lormand, and Pattie Green Webinar: Making a Difference in Students' Lives Through Use of Open Education Resources
April 2, 2015

Robbie Melton Webinar: Using Emerging Mobile Technologies and Gadgets in Science and Allied Health Courses
January 30, 2015

Brian Udermann Webinar: Strategies to Improve Your Online Teaching Now!
December 5, 2014

Kemi Jona Webinar: Comparing the perception of simulation and remote labs among undergraduate students
September 19, 2014

Farah Bennani Webinar: Creating Engaging Remote Web-based Labs
July 16, 2014

CHEO Discipline Panel Faculty Professional Development Workshop: Building the Dream - Creating Engaging Allied Health Lab Content
May 15-16, 2014, Boulder, CO

A. Daniel (Dan) Johnson Webinar: From Cookbook to Guidebook: Remaking Traditional Biology Labs into Active Inquiries
February 6, 2014

Suzanne Buie and Dan Branan Webinar: Experiencing a NANSLO Remote Web-based Meiosis and Mitosis Lab Activity
December 6, 2013

Albert Balbon, Barbara Bolson, Suzanne Buie, and Susan Mircovich, NANSLO Demonstration for the University of Alaska Anchorage
November 1, 2013

Kemi Jona Webinar: Remote Online Labs: A New Model for Teaching and Learning Scientific Practices
September 16, 2013

CHEO Faculty and Staff Workshop: Development of Online Courses and Use of NANSLO Labs
June 13-14, 2013, Boulder, CO

 


Past Webinars:
 
Making a Difference in Students' Lives Through Use of Open Education Resources
 
Speakers: 
Mary Burgess, acting executive director, BCcampus. 
Kate Lormand, CHEO curriculum lead allied health/biology and adjunct faculty, CCConline and Great Falls College Montana State University
Pattie Green, biology faculty, Tacoma Community College

BCcampus is a publicly funded organization that uses information technology to connect the expertise, programs, and resources of all British Columbia post-secondary institutions under a collaborative service delivery framework.  As part of the CHEO initiative funded by a U.S. Department of Labor TAACCCT grant, BCcampus was asked to review and identify several textbooks that could be used for pre-requisite science courses taught in the allied health field.  BCcampus engaged several CHEO instructors in reviewing these texts.  All were highly rated by these instructors and those it works with in British Columbia.  In this webinar, Mary Burgess shared information on the process used to review these textbooks.  Kate Lormand, one of those reviewers, discussed her role in reviewing and providing feedback on a science textbook.  In September  2012, Tacoma Community College started a campaign called “Liberate $250K.”   The goal of the OER Project was to increase access to education by lowering textbook costs while providing a quality learning experience.  It was estimated that by April 2013, students saved a collective $266,000 in textbook costs (1,200 students enrolled in OER courses).  Pattie Green, one of the faculty participating in that initiative, will provide her perspectives on OER. 

These presenters covered:  

  • Openly Licensed CHEO Science Textbooks:  Discussed how books were selected, the rubric that was used to review them, and how to access them for use in courses.
    Mary Burgess
  • OER Textbook Review Process:  Spoke about the process she used as one of the reviewers of CHEO science textbook in reviewing and providing feedback and suggestions.
    Kate Lormand
  • A Faculty View of OER:  Talked about how she incorporated OER content into her biology classes including the thought process and steps used to deliver that content.  She also discussed both pros and cons of using OER and developing one’s own OER content.
    Pattie Green

CHEO textbooks reviewed for this initiative:

In addition, BCcampus suggested several others that might be useful in allied health:

To view links to other openly licensed textbooks posted through BCcampus, go to BCcampus open resources website.  



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Using Emerging Mobile Technologies and Gadgets in Science and Allied Health Courses
 
RobbieMeltonSpeaker:  Robbie Melton, associate vice chancellor of mobilization and emerging technology, Tennessee Board of Regents

Mobilization (the use of smart phones, tablets and mobile apps) has impacted every facet of education and the workplace across the globe.  Robbie Melton, Associate Vice Chancellor of Mobilization Emerging Technology, Tennessee Board of Regents, leads her organization in providing support to campuses and assists faculty and students in utilizing mobilization as teaching, learning, training, and workforce tools, as well as for increasing student engagement and retention.  Learn from this internationally-recognized expert about emerging mobile technologies and gadgets used in all areas of education Pre-K through College including science and allied health courses.

Presentation Material: 

Strategies to Improve Your Online Teaching Now!

Speaker: Brian Udermann, director of online education, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Webinar Date: December 5, 2014

Whether you are new to online learning or have been teaching online for a number of years, you will find this informative and interactive webinar useful. Topics covered included engaging online learners, instructor presence, managing the workload of online teaching, assessment, and facilitating effective online discussions. Brian also answered questions with respect to work in converting CHEO allied health courses to online/hybrid delivery.



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Comparing the perception of simulation and remote labs among undergraduate students

Kemi JonaSpeaker:  Dr. Kemi Jona, research professor of learning sciences and computer science,
                  Northwestern University
Webinar Date:  September 19, 2014

Simulations versus remote web-based science labs . . . what choice is the most appropriate for students?  Research notes that each format plays an important pedagogical role and has inherent strengths and weaknesses. 

In Getting real: the authenticity of remote labs and simulations for science learning, a paper published in Distance Education (2013), Jona and several other Northwestern University colleagues reported on the results of a study of 123 undergraduate students taking physics and compared their experience using remote and simulated labs.  Most students were first-year students taking physics while the remainder were a blend of sophomore, junior and senior students.

In this webinar, Kemi will discuss in more detail the findings from this article and answer questions you may have with respect to simulations and remote web-based lab activities as it pertains to this study. 

We also suggested that participants read the article on simulations and remote web-based science labs – Delivering authentic experiences for engineering students and professionals through e-labs, written by Aaron Coble, Andrew Smallbone, and Amit Bhave, CMCL Innovations, Cambridge, U.K. and Roger Watson, Andreas Braumann, Markus Kraft, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K. prior to attending the webinar.

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Creating Engaging Remote Web-based Labs

Speaker: Farah Bennani, collegewide chair, online learning, for math, science, allied health, and psychology, Front Range Community College, and CHEO curriculum lead
Webinar Date:  July 16, 2014

Whether developing a remote web-based or a face-to-face lab, key steps are used to develop a lab that is challenging and engaging for your students.  Farah Bennani, NANSLO’s allied health curriculum lead for the CHEO initiative and college wide chair, online learning for math, science, allied health, and psychology, FRCC, shared her steps in developing labs for NANSLO as well as for her face-to-face allied health courses at FRCC, including:  (1) identifying the lab learning objectives; (2) selecting applicable background information; and (3) insuring that the learning objectives drive the sequence of lab activities and questions.

 She also discussed:  (1) why questions poised are constructed using an inquiry-based model; (2) why formative questions are used for procedural exercises; and (3) why summary questions at the end of each lab are more summative.  Examples of questions used in existing NANSLO lab activities were provided.

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From Cookbook to Guidebook: Remaking Traditional Biology Labs into Active Inquiries

Dan Johnson, Wake Forest University, CHEO Webinar SpeakerSpeaker:  A. Daniel (Dan) Johnson, core curriculum coordinator for biology, Wake Forest University
Webinar Date:  February 6, 2014

Whether students perform a science lab through one of our NANSLO remote web-based science labs or in a face-to-face lab setting, constructing your lab using an active inquiry model provides students with an environment that complements what scientists do when they make empirical observations and develop evidence-based explanations of the natural world, and it gives students an opportunity to apply higher thinking skills. 

In this webinar, Johnson discussed how to convert a “Diffusion Through a Membrane” demonstration and confirmation lab into a guided inquiry exercise.  He discussed how students are presented with a basic problem to solve and must decide what methods they will use to solve it and present their findings. 

Johnson, an associate teaching professor and the Core Curriculum Coordinator for biology at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, NC, guided participants through:  (1) common questions about designing guided inquiry labs; (2) renovating a classic demo lab by setting general learning objectives, disassembling an existing lab exercise into reusable components, and scaffolding a revised exercise using an inquiry-oriented general template; and (3) choosing specific activities for the revised exercise and discussed informal methods for assessing learning outcomes.

Participants were asked to bring questions on applying this knowledge to the development of their own lab activities and using best practices for inquiry lab designs for Dr. Johnson to answer during the open dialog part of this session.

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Experiencing a NANSLO Remote Web-based Meiosis and Mitosis Lab Activity

Suzanne BuieSpeaker:  Suzanne Buie, DPT, STC, department chair of health sciences, Kodiak College University of Alaska Anchorage and Dan Branan, lab director, NANSLO Colorado Node
Webinar Date: December 6, 2013

How does your student actually perform a NANSLO lab activity?  What do they see and do?  Do they see value in using a remote web-based lab?  How is it incorporated into a class?  Buie used the NANSLO Meiosis and Mitosis Lab Activity in her fall 2013 human biology class.  She shared her insights into the value of remote web-based labs, described how it worked for her lab assignment, how she integrated it into her class, and her students’ reaction to the lab.  Next, Branan  provided an overview of the LabView control panel used to perform microscope activities.  Then, using a short lab activity provided to faculty in advance of this webinar, participants were given an opportunity to take control and perform a component of the meiosis and mitosis lab activity.  Participants experienced what a student would do during a NANSLO lab activity.  They were asked, at the end, to share reflections on their experience, including the best part of the activity and ways it could be improved.  They were asked to bring questions as well for presenters to answer.

NANSLO Demonstration for the University of Alaska Anchorage NANLSO Mitosis and Meiosis Lab Activity

Speakers:  Albert Balbon, NANSLO British Columbia Laboratory, North Island College (NIC), and Supervisor, Distributed Learning, NIC; Barbara Bolson, Fiscal Leader, Consortium for Healthcare Education Online (CHEO), and Director, Kodiak College, University of Alaska Anchorage; Suzanne Buie, CHEO Project Leader, and Department Chair, Health and Science, Kodiak College, University of Alaska Anchorage; and Susan Mircovich, Assistant Professor, Chemistry, Kenai Peninsula College, University of Alaska Anchorage
Webinar Date:  November 1, 2013

The North American Network of Science Laboratories Online (NANSLO) demonstrated how students complete an assigned NANSLO Mitotis and Meiosis lab activity remotely using its web-enabled control panel to manipulate a highly sophisticated microscope to zoom in to a slide placed on the microscope stage, zoom in and out, change lenses, focus in and and out using fine and coarse settings,  capture high resolution images of the slide for lab reports, and using various enhancement features including color selections to apply to the image to obtain excellent image quality and identification of mitosis and meiosis taking place.

Remote Online Labs: A New Model for Teaching and Learning Scientific Practices

Kemi JonaSpeaker: Dr. Kemi Jona, research professor of learning sciences and computer science, Northwestern University
Webinar Date: September 16, 2013

To overcome some of the challenges to effective and broadly accessible science labs, we have developed a new cyber learning tool www.ilabcentral.org that enables students to use real experimental devices housed in a central or remote location via a web browser. Because remote labs are available 24/7 in the "cloud", students can carry out their lab assignments from any location with Internet access, providing significantly more lab time with greater flexibility of access, and improved inquiry learning outcomes. Moreover, remote online labs can provide students with the opportunity to engage in more authentic scientific inquiry tasks, and it supports broader exposure to science and engineering professions. From a scalability and sustainability perspective, many students can be supported with limited equipment.  A regional or national strategy for providing access to science labs can now be contemplated.

In this session, Kemi discussed remote online labs and how they address the challenges faced in providing all students with access to high quality STEM laboratory experiences. A live demonstration of a remote lab was shared, followed by a discussion about the effectiveness of remote labs in supporting the learning scientific practices and some interesting comparisons with simulations.

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Past Workshops:

CHEO Discipline Panel Faculty Development Workshop - By Design: Taking ALL Allied Health Students Across the Finish Line
May 14-15, 2015, Boulder, CO

CHEO Discipline Panel Faculty Professional Development Workshop, Building the Dream - Creating Engaging Allied Health Lab Content

 

May 15-16, 2014, Boulder, CO

 

Presenters at the workshop included:

  1. Dan Johnson, core curriculum coordinator for biology, Wake Forest University (Johnson PowerPoint)
  2. Farah Bennani, Farnosh Family, and Kate Lormand, NANSLO curriculum leads
  3. Suzanne Buie, department chair of health sciences, Kodiak College University of Alaska Anchorage (Buie PowerPoint)
  4. John Fellers, web design manager, WICHE (Fellers PowerPoint)
  5. Susan Mircovich, assistant professor of chemistry, Kenai Peninsula College, University of Alaska Anchorage (Mircovich Presentation)
  6. Alison Albertson, instructor and director, Medical Laboratory Technician program, Lake Area Technical Institute and Mona Gleysteen, instructor, Medical Laboratory Technician program, Lake Area Technical Institute
  7. Quincie Lords, department chair, biology, Great Falls College Montana State University (Lords Presentation)
  8. Brenda Canine, NANSLO lab manager and microbiology and chemistry adjunct faculty, Great Falls College Montana State University
  9. Dan Casmier, chemistry faculty and natural sciences department chair, Great Falls College Montana State University
  10. Stuart Speedie, professor of health informatics, University of Minnesota, and executive director, Great Plans Telehealth Resource and Assistance Center (Speedie PowerPoint)

Faculty also participated in working sessions to further the development of the NANSLO lab activities used in their classes and toured the NANSLO Colorado Node located at Red Rocks Community College to get a first-hand look at the equipment students are using for their remote web-based lab experience. 

See the final program for more detailed information.
 

Faculty and Staff Workshop on Development of Online Courses and Use of NANSLO Labs
June 13-14, 2013, Boulder, CO

Faculty and instructional design staff from each institution engaged in the development of online or hybrid course material for the CHEO grant were invited to attend this workshop.  Faculty experts from other colleges presented information on best practices in online course and lab experiment development.  Presentations were focused on online pedagogy and course design, creating openly-licensed courses, and a tour of new and emerging technologies and applications for teaching online.  See the CHEO wiki for more information about that workshop and the presentations and material covered at the event.   

At the June 2013 faculty professional development workshop, faculty identified a number of NANSLO web-based lab activities they would like to have developed for use in their allied health and pre-health classes required for allied health certificates and degrees. 

Faculty and Staff Participating in CHEO Professional Development Workshop June 13-14, 2013

CHEO Participants - Faculty and Staff Workshop on
Development of Online Courses and Use of NANSLO Labs
June 13-14, 2013
Boulder, CO

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