Legislative Advisory Committee

 2010 Annual Meeting

Agenda and Presentations

 

Tuesday, October 5

A Critical Piece of the Completion Puzzle: Why We Need to Better Serve Adult Learners

States are facing pressure to increase degree attainment to overcome economic challenges and achieve national education goals. Meeting these demands takes a comprehensive strategy with focus on all students, including adults, who have not always been served well by higher education. This session will provide data about adult learners and offer insight into why states and institutions need to better serve this population.

Moderator:

David Longanecker, president, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education

Speaker:

Patrick Kelly, senior associate, National Center for Higher Education Management Systems PRESENTATION

State Strategies for Serving Ready Adults: Lessons from WICHE’s Non-traditional No More Project

Recent data show that about 20.1 percent of the nation’s adult population (25 years and older) have some college and no degree. Successfully reaching and serving these potential students is a necessary component of an effective strategy for increasing degree attainment. With funding from Lumina Foundation for Education, WICHE has been working closely with six states—Arkansas, Colorado, Nevada, New Jersey, North Dakota, and South Dakota—to identify and remove barriers that prevent those who have earned a substantial number of college credits, but who have yet to return to college, from completing their degrees. Learn some of the many valuable lessons that can be useful to those interested in better serving this group of potential students.

Moderator:

Patrick Lane, project coordinator, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education

Speakers:

Janelle Toman, director of communications, South Dakota Board of Regents PRESENTATION

Representative Johnnie Roebuck, Arkansas PRESENTATION

Photo of legislators from 2010 LAC Annual Meeting
Sen. Kim Gillian (MT), Rep. Robert McKim (WY), Rep. Johnnie Roebuck (AR
)

 

The Topic that Shall Not be Named: Solving the Remedial Education Problem

Facing national college completion goals, declining budgets, and economic pressures, states now are looking to find ways to fix the remedial education problem. This session will highlight important research trends and innovative strategies so that states and institutions can make informed decisions about how to better serve ready adults.

Moderator:

Demaree Michelau, director of policy analysis, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education

Speaker:

Davis Jenkins, senior researcher, Community College Research Center at Teachers College, Columbia University PRESENTATION

The Legislative Role in Transfer and Articulation

States, systems, and institutions have struggled with the challenge of negotiating agreements to ensure that students who want to transfer between institutions do not lose college credits that they have already earned. Poor transfer systems cost students and states significant resources and negatively impact college attainment rates. This session will feature the latest research conducted by WICHE and WCET on how states can build stronger and more effective systems for facilitating successful student transfer.

Speakers:

Mollie McGill, deputy director of programs and membership, WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies (WCET)

Demarée Michelau, director of policy analysis, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education PRESENTATION

Photo from 2010 LAC Annual Meeting
Sen. David Nething (ND), Rep. Bob Martinson (ND), Mollie McGill (WICHE)


Wednesday, October 6 

What’s Up At WICHE? An Update on WICHE Projects, Activities, and Resources

While the Legislative Advisory Committee primarily focuses on state policy issues affecting the West, WICHE is engaged in several other projects and activities that benefit the region. Learn about these exciting projects, activities, and resources.

Moderator:

David Longanecker, president, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education

Speakers:

Jere Mock, vice president for programs and services, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education PRESENTATION

Brian Prescott, director of policy research, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education

Mimi McFaul, associate director, mental health program, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education

Mollie McGill, deputy director of programs and membership, WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies (WCET)

Photo from 2010 Annual Meeting
David Longanecker, president, WICHE

8.45 – 9.45 am

Complete College America: A Primer for Legislators

College enrollment has steadily been increasing since 1970, yet completion rates have remained flat. While more students from different backgrounds have had access to college, performance gaps remain. In 2009, Complete College America was established to significantly increase the number of Americans with a college degree or credential of value and to close attainment gaps for traditionally underrepresented populations. In partnership with their institutions, 23 states have now joined the alliance and pledged to set completion goals, develop action plans and move key policy levers, and collect and report common measures of progress. Learn about this initiative and what it means for state legislators.

Moderator:

Brian Prescott, director of policy research, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education

Speakers:

Brenda Bautsch, policy specialist, National Conference of State Legislatures

Tom Sugar, senior vice president, Complete College America PRESENTATION

Travis Reindl, program director, postsecondary education, National Governors Association PRESENTATION

Photo of speaker Travis Reindl from 2010 Annual Meeting
Brenda Bautsch, National Conference of State Legislators; Tom Sugar, Complete College America; Travis Reindl, National Governors Association

An Idea Whose Time Has Come? Funding Incentives to Promote College Completion

Performance funding is not a new concept in higher education policy, but recently a relatively new form of it has been gaining steam in the U.S. and even has been adopted in a number of states. The concept of funding higher education on the basis of course (or degree) completions instead of enrollments is being considered as a viable strategy for promoting college completion. Hear about how these policies were adopted and are being implemented in two states.

Moderator:

David Longanecker, president, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education

Speakers:

Russ Deaton, director of fiscal policy and facilities analysis, Tennessee Higher Education Commission PRESENTATION

Richard L. Petrick, consultant (retired vice chancellor for finance, Ohio Board of Regents) PRESENTATION