Internet Course Exchange (ICE)

Stakeholders

ICE has several different types of stakeholders: students, faculty members, and higher education administrators and policy makers

Perhaps the stakeholders who benefit the most, however, are the American taxpayer and citizen. When ICE consortium institutions aggregate the supply of empty seats in online courses and student demand for them across the consortia, they can operate more cost effectively. In the end, these institutions lower their costs for developing and delivering online courses while meeting their students’ needs with expanded access. It is an excellent example of higher education institutions “doing more with less.”

ICE also allows its consortium institutions to respond more quickly to workforce needs as their faculty share expertise in the development and delivery of new online courses and programs. By working together, they can respond more quickly than a single institution could. This timely response is increasingly critical in the global economy.